Quinnipiac University

Compassion: A Path to Global Well-Being Conference, Day 1

Starts September 29, 2022 at 9:00 AM (ET)

Ends September 29, 2022 at 4:00 PM (ET)

Center for Compassion and Creativity, Quinnipiac Albert Schweitzer Institute

The challenges we face in the 21st Century are myriad: come explore how to cultivate the skills of active compassion that can help to prepare us individually and as a society to meet these challenges and build a more peaceful, just and sustainable future.

Through music, contemplation, and panel conversations on current issues, the conference will explore:

  • How can we reduce stress, anger and self-focus?

  • How can we cultivate compassionate insight, well-being and contentment?

  • How can we integrate self-care with caring for others?

  • How can we navigate the challenges in our daily life, communities, and environment?

  • How can compassion provide solutions to the micro, mezzo and macro issues we face?

  • How can we identify and overcome compassion fatigue?

This conference will be focused around Compassion’s Compass by Wilson C. Hurley, who worked closely with Quinnipiac’s own Thomas Pruzinski, PhD.

As Professor Hurley astutely reminds us:

“…The mind tends to amplify the thoughts and feelings on which it focuses. Some mental states are conducive to well-being while others increase experiences of distress. By consciously cultivating a positive focus and weeding out afflictive mental states, internal well-being is strengthened.”

This conference is sponsored by Quinnipiac’s Albert Schweitzer Institute (ASI), in collaboration with the Center for Compassion and Creativity (CCC). It supports ASI’s mission to expand students’ horizons in sustainable living, humanitarian values, health care and peace, and the mission of the CCC to weave compassion and creativity into individual minds and society for the betterment of all.

Attend the Event

Thursday, September 29 Schedule

9 a.m. - Welcome/opening comments

Session Topic

Identifying, preventing, and recovering from burnout: relevant for teachers, health professionals, and other helping professionals. 

Opening Music

Heart Sutra - Stephen Dydo, Chinese guqin

Moderator

Denise Bevza, an attorney who practices law in New London, Connecticut and serves on the Board of Directors for (DNKL) Do Ngak Kunphen Ling, in Redding CT, as well as a Board member for (CCC) Center for Compassion and Creativity, Inc.  Legal matters often require us to change patterns that no longer work. If we bring wrathful compassion to this process, we come into greater clarity and discernment to soften our resistance.

Panelists

Sofia Cappolla, a sophomore in the honors program at Quinnipiac University. She is an athletic training and physical therapy major and is very interested in all things health-related: mental, physical, and emotional.

Anne Dichele, the Dean of the School of Education at Quinnipiac. She previously was a professor of Reading and Language Arts and director of the Master of Arts in Teaching programs. Anne has practiced daily meditation for over 40 years and is a graduate of the Living School, a spiritual program of study provided through the Center for Action and Contemplation in New Mexico headed by Richard Rohr.  Anne also has two published poetry collections through Antrim House Books.

Lyuba Konopasek, MD is the Senior Associate Dean for Education at the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University, overseeing undergraduate and graduate medical education. Prior to joining Netter, she was the Director for Physician Engagement and Well-Being Programs for NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital in New York. She currently focuses her faculty development and scholarly activities on physician well-being.

Dr. Emily McCave, a Professor of Social Work in the School of Health Sciences. Her area of expertise is children’s mental health as well as suicide prevention. She is a certified Mental Health First Aid Trainer and works per diem as a Crisis Clinician for Youth Mobile Crisis Intervention Services at Wellmore Behavioral Health.

Steve McGuinn, an associate professor of criminal justice and director of the criminal justice program at Quinnipiac. He holds an A.B. from the University of Chicago, an MS from Columbia University and a PhD from the University of Maryland, College Park. As a strong believer in experiential learning, he has taught upper-level seminars inside Connecticut state prisons – with Quinnipiac students learning alongside currently incarcerated men. He is the former director and one of the founding members of the Prison Project at Quinnipiac. Prior to receiving his doctorate, he worked as a mental health clinician and unit supervisor on Rikers Island in New York City. Since arriving at Quinnipiac, he has published one book on prison management, one book on reentry after incarceration, and along with Alan Bruce, he has written an introductory Criminal Justice text.

Closing Music

Albert Schweitzer plays Bach

Session Topic

Racial, gender, class, and religious biases and their impact on societal conflicts, acts of violence, and political polarization. How do we heal from this?

Opening Music

Ashokan Farewell, Unger & Mason - Susan Altabet, flute, Stephen Dydo, guitar

Moderator

Anat Biletzki, Albert Schweitzer Professor of Philosophy at Quinnipiac University, after having been Professor of Philosophy at Tel Aviv University for over 30 years.  She was Chair of the Board of B’Tselem, the Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories, and is now Vice President of the Board of the World Peace Foundation (at Tufts University).  Her most recent book, Philosophy of Human Rights: A Systematic Introduction, is an exercise in putting together her two passions – human rights and philosophy.

Panelists

Daniele Botti, Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Quinnipiac University.  Daniele has previously taught courses in philosophy and political theory at Fairfield University and Yale University.  He is the author of the book John Rawls and American Pragmatism: Between Engagement and Avoidance.

Carrie Kaas, Associate Dean of Experiential Education and Associate Professor of Law, Quinnipiac University School of Law.  She also serves as the Director of two of the Law School’s Concentrations:  Family Law, and Civil Advocacy and Dispute Resolution, and is the co-director of the law school’s Center on Dispute Resolution.  She teaches clinical courses, Client Interviewing and Counseling, Mediation, Negotiation, and a new course for first-year students on professional identity formation and lawyer well-being.  She has written on legal education, clinical legal education, family law, and mediation. She contributed a chapter to “Lawyers As Changemakers” on integrative law and legal education.

Pete Longley, a nurse for over 26 years, gaining most of his clinical health care experiences at Yale New Haven Health System. The most exciting and memorable experiences were concentrated in the critical care area of the Surgical Intensive Care Unit. He also has diverse backgrounds in nurse management, patient throughput, data analysis, and healthcare finance. One day he will figure out how to improve healthcare for everyone.

Marcos S. Scauso, an Assistant Professor of Political Science in the Department of Philosophy and Political Science. His research lies at the intersection of International Relations and identity politics, with a concentration on indigenous voices in post-colonial Latin America and issues of intersectionality. His book, Intersectional Decoloniality: Reimagining IR and the Problem of Difference builds on extensive fieldwork in Bolivia to discuss colonial legacies and decolonial alternatives.

Losang Tendrol, a Chinese American nun. She took ordination in 2008 in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition. Currently, she teaches and studies at Do Ngak Kunphen Ling in Redding, CT.

Closing Music

Tiokasin Ghosthorse plays Native American music

Session Topic

Recovering from care-giver fatigue and renewing a wish to help others.

Opening Music 

Mistress Shuttlecock’s Dump, Dydo – Susan Altabet, flute, Stephen Dydo, guitar

Moderator

Kim Hartmann is a professor of occupational therapy and the director of the center for interprofessional healthcare education.  Her area of practice is working with children who are medically fragile, their family, and their care providers.  

Panelists

The Venerable Shim Bo, a Zen Buddhist Monk who serves as Abbot and Spiritual Director of White Lotus Haven Zen of Connecticut, located in Collinsville, CT.  He also serves as Buddhist Chaplain on Sacred Heart University’s Interfaith Ministry team.  He is a Dharma Mentor in the Buddhist Association of the United States Prisoner Correspondence Course, whose mission is to familiarize and support incarcerated individuals with Buddhist teachings and guidance, and to assist them integrating Buddhist practice into everyday life.

Ilene Rosenberg MD FCCP is Associate Professor of Medical Sciences at the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University where she is Director of Clinical Skills Remediation and is an active member in the development of the clinical skills course at Netter. She brought “The Healer’s Art” course to Netter and was one of the faculty who helped develop a chapter of the Gold Humanism Society at Netter. Dr. Rosenberg received her MD from Johns Hopkins, did her residency at University of Chicago and her pulmonary fellowship at Yale. She has been in private practice in Milford CT since 1986 practicing patient centered medicine; she now splits her time between practice and teaching. Dr. Rosenberg’s “Netter’s Clinical Skills Pocket Guide” was published by Elsevier in 2019.

Dr. Teresa Twomey is an associate professor of nursing in Quinnipiac University’s School of Nursing. She is also the Chair, Undergraduate Nursing Programs and the Director of Global Nursing Experiences. Her passion lies in educating nursing students in the area of cultural relativism and leading them toward a path of holism and global citizenship. Over the past several years Dr. Twomey has led nursing experiential learning trips to Nicaragua, Guatemala and Barbados, where nursing students have worked closely with community partners.

Anna-leila Williams, PhD, MPH is Professor of Medical Sciences at the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University. Her research on cancer family caregivers has been published widely. Dr. Williams’ textbook, Integrating Health Humanities, Social Sciences, and Clinical Care: A Guide to Self-awareness, Compassion, and Well-being, was published by Routledge, Taylor & Francis in 2019. Anna-leila is a member of Harmony Sangha and studies and practices Engaged Buddhism in the Plum Village tradition of Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh.

Closing Music

Janet Ettele's Compassion Piano Mandalas

Session Topic

Addressing social dynamics that lead to bullying, intolerance and conflict.

Opening Music

Fantasie in d minor, Telemann– Susan Altabet, flute

Moderator

Stephen Dydo is a composer whose works focusing on the search for a spiritual basis to modern life have been performed in the US, Europe, and Asia; he has a doctorate in composition from Columbia University, and has taught music theory and performance at Columbia, William Paterson University, the New School, and Greenwich House.  As a founding board member for the Center for Compassion, Creativity and Innovation and Western Connecticut State University, he worked to develop a series of conferences on compassion in education, following the direction of HH the Dalai Lama; he has continued working with its successor, the independent Center for Compassion and Creativity. Currently active in the music scenes of New York and Western Massachusetts, he is also on the boards of the CCC, the Association for the Promotion of New Music, and DNKL Tibetan Buddhist Center for Universal Peace, Redding CT.

Panelists

Dr. Karen Bauce, DNP, MPA, RN, NEA-BC is a clinical assistant professor and former Associate Dean of online programs at Sacred Heart University, where she has been teaching in the online graduate programs for over six years. She has been a member of SHU’s workgroup for their Center for Compassion since 2016 and is the co-coordinator of their Annual Dialog on Compassion, held every spring. Dr. Bauce has had a life-long interest in compassion—in both the science that underpins it and in the application in daily living, in small and grand gestures and everything in between.  

Diane Langlan-Wortz earned an M.A. in Forensic Psychology from John Jay College of Criminal Justice and has contributed to the field of victimology and victim services for over 20 years. Diane began her career providing direct advocacy and support services to victims of violence.  Drawing on her practical experiences, Diane provided education and training to law enforcement and judicial staff to help in the development of trauma-informed practices for criminal justice practitioners.  Diane is now dedicated to growing the field of victimology in academia.

Wayne Lavender, a United Methodist pastor, teacher and author. Currently, he serves as the executive director of the Foundation 4 Orphans and as a part-time faculty member in the political science department at Quinnipiac University. He lives close to nature in Hamden with his wife Maureen.

Closing Music

Live Compassion Song

Friday, September 30 Schedule

Session Topic

Helping front-line workers and care-givers move beyond their own irritation, traumatic memory, or rage to mobilize kindness in assisting others.  

Moderator

Sean Duffy, Professor of Political Science, and Executive Director of the Albert Schweitzer Institute at Quinnipiac, where he has been a member of the faculty for twenty-five years.  He is happy that his role at the Schweitzer Institute gives him the opportunity to work towards building a Culture of Peace at Quinnipiac, by introducing an ethical framework into our consideration of peace, human rights, environmental stewardship and human health and development.

Panelists

Susan Altabet, spent most of her musical career in New York City working as a singer in churches, synagogues and other professional choirs such as the Gregg Smith Singers. She has most recently been teaching piano, voice, flute and recorders privately and at the Red Barn Music School in Amherst MA.  For over 25 years, she has been an avid student and practitioner of Tibetan Buddhism, and has worked on translations of many Buddhist texts into English with the Tibetan Classics Translators Guild of New York. She is a founding board member of Center for Compassion and Creativity as well as of DNKL Tibetan Buddhist Center for Universal Peace, Redding CT. 

Julie Booth, a Clinical Associate Professor in the physical therapy department at QU. She has 30 years of experience as a practicing PT in a variety of settings ranging from inpatient adult and pediatric rehabilitation to her current area of practice as a school based physical therapist. She has also been involved in community engagement activities locally and internationally including as a member of the academic board of an OT/PT school in Haiti.

Maya Doyle, an associate professor of social work at QU, and an experienced healthcare social worker, primarily in pediatrics.  Her work and research has been focused on individuals and families living with rare and chronic illnesses, around issues including mental health and wellness, trauma, quality of life, treatment adherence, the transition from pediatric to adult care, systemic barriers ,and inequities. She is equally invested in how the healthcare team cares for themselves and each other.  She is one of QU’s Interprofessional Education fellows for 2022-2024.

JoAnne Wilcox, a Quinnipiac alumna. As a member of the class of 2020, she focused her studies on a multidisciplinary degree to reinforce the work she was already doing in the community.  She actively works to implement strategies in New Haven that reinforce connection through art, design, and restorative practices. 

Closing Music

Walter Reiter plays Biber's Mystery Sonatas

Session Topic

Keeping a client’s needs paramount when working within profit-driven systems.

Moderator

Mohammad Niamat Elahee Ph.D., a professor of International Business, has been teaching at Quinnipiac since 1999. He has also taught at universities in Bangladesh, Mexico, France, China, and Egypt, and recently was a US Fulbright Professor at Al Zaytoonah University of Jordan in Amman. His research interests include cross-cultural negotiation, foreign investment, consumer animosity and ethnocentrism, and globalization. Prior to joining academia, Dr. Elahee worked at Deloitte & Touche, the Canadian International Development Agency (Dhaka Office) and the World Bank Headquarters in Washington DC. Locally, he is involved with Columbus House, Peace Island Institute, and Hamden Rotary Club.

Panelists

Carrie A. Bulger, a Professor of Psychology at Quinnipiac, with an affiliate appointment in the Department of Medical Studies. She received her doctorate and master’s degrees in Industrial-Organizational Psychology at the University of Connecticut. Dr. Bulger teaches courses in I-O Psychology, Occupational Health Psychology, Advanced Organizational Psychology, Adult Developmental Psychology, and a history-based Capstone course for majors. Dr. Bulger’s research focuses broadly on employee stress, health, and well-being, especially as these are impacted by the intersection between work and non-work demands.

MaryNell Disman, a graduate student in the Master of Occupational Therapy program at Quinnipiac. She has attended the Nobel Peace Summit and ECOSOC Youth Conference with the Albert Schweitzer Institute where she deepened her passion for Sustainable Development Goals, social justice and sustainable practices. She aspires to deliver compassionate, client-centered care as a future occupational therapist and promote justice, equity, diversity & inclusion (JEDI) practices within the profession.

Margaret A. Goralski, received her PhD from the International School of Management, Paris France and is a full-time faculty member in the QU Department of Entrepreneurship, International Business & Strategy. She currently serves on the UN PRME NA steering committee and is the UN PRME Global Working Group Liaison.

John Thomas, a freelance writer, cyclist, performing guitarist, and professor at the Quinnipiac University School of law, probably in that order. He’s also a lot taller and younger than he looks.

Dr. Tracy Van Oss, a full-time clinical professor in the Occupational Therapy Department, earned her degrees including a Doctor of Health Science, a Master in Public Health, a Bachelor of Science in Corporate Communication, and a post-bachelorette certificate in occupational therapy from Quinnipiac. She has worked in acute care and has over 20 + years of working with patients in home health care as an occupational therapist.

Closing Music

Selections from Stephen Dydo's Reflection

Session Topic

How to turn the challenges of daily living into opportunities to grow and enhance compassionate insight. 

Moderator

Denise Bevza, an attorney who practices law in New London, Connecticut and serves on the Board of Directors for (DNKL) Do Ngak Kunphen Ling, in Redding CT, as well as a Board member for (CCC) Center for Compassion and Creativity, Inc.  Legal matters often require us to change patterns that no longer work. If we bring wrathful compassion to this process, we come into greater clarity and discernment, soften our resistance, and can then take more effective action to reclaim our lives.

Panelists 

Lee Barstow, a pastor of the Leverett (MA) Congregational Church, UCC. He pursues a universal, multi-faith approach for internal practice to grow love and peace in the world. His efforts began in 1974 with an esoteric spiritual community and have included leading collaborative discussion groups at Amherst College and Western Mass. His areas of study include Process Theology and Celtic Christian spirituality. This summer, he walked the 500-mile Camino de Santiago with his wife Cynthia, broadening his understanding of current multi-faith pilgrimage.

Professor Greg Garvey, first joined Quinnipiac in 1999 as the Visiting Fellow in the Arts and helped launch what is today the Program in Graphic Interactive Design.  He recently published the book chapter “Ungrading, Grading Contracts, Gamification & Game Based Learning” in Active Learning - Research and Practice,  edited by Delfén Ortega-Sánchez, and published by IntechOpen, New York. 

For over 20 years, Megan Mook, thoroughly immersed herself in the study of Buddhism, yoga, and natural healing. She has a Master’s Degree in Buddhist Studies and has worked on several Tibetan language translation projects. She believes that the deepest learning begins by becoming present with what is actually happening, rather than focussing on what we’re trying to gain or avoid. For this reason, all of her teaching emphasizes being present with whatever arises with openness, attention, and tenderness.

JT Torres, directs the center for teaching and learning, a space that operates as part of an ecology of care. CTL helps faculty cultivate and steward learning environments rich with the support, creativity, and curiosity needed for everyone to flourish.

Elyssa Wrubel, an Advising Specialist for the College of Arts and Sciences and is also a Quinnipiac alumna. She has learned much about compassion through her work with two international NGOs--Dar Si Hmad for Development, Education, and Culture in Morocco and the Oxford Consortium for Human Rights. 

Closing Music

Chant by monks of Drepung Monastery

Session Topic

Areas of societal, global, and environmental crisis that are in the most need of care.

Moderator

Anat Biletzki, Albert Schweitzer Professor of Philosophy at Quinnipiac University, after having been Professor of Philosophy at Tel Aviv University for over 30 years.  She was Chair of the Board of B’Tselem, the Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories, and is now Vice President of the Board of the World Peace Foundation (at Tufts University).  Her most recent book, Philosophy of Human Rights: A Systematic Introduction, is an exercise in putting together her two passions – human rights and philosophy.

Panelists

Kelly Frier, a senior Health Science Studies major with minors in Global Public Health and Biology and a former ASI Human Rights & Global Engagement intern. She constantly strives to be compassionate and an advocate for sustainability and global collaboration.

Sujata Gadkar-Wilcox, an Associate Professor of Legal Studies and Chair of the Justice and Law department at Quinnipiac. As the Executive Director of the Oxford Consortium for Human Rights, she is dedicated to helping participants broaden their understanding of human rights and learn how to use the tools of community action to collaborate with local and global communities to advocate for social change.

Reena Judd, has been a Rabbi for thirty-five years; for the last 19, she has been Rabbi at Quinnipiac.  She believes that mercy is the most relevant part of what she does as a Rabbi: she tries to use it in every interaction she has, all else is secondary.  Reena is working on a book entitled White by Default: Reflections on Race, Religion and the Bible.  She sees the Bible primarily as a tool for mercy: if we start from the beginning, “In God’s image we’re all created,” we must see mercy.

Sarah Lawson, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biological Science and an affiliated faculty in the Environmental Science & Sustainability program. Her research interests are on pollinator health and nutrition.

Closing Music

Songs of Peace, Nawang Kechog, flute

Session Topic

Wedding career goals with one’s compassionate goals. 

Moderator

Sean Duffy, a Professor of Political Science, and Executive Director of the Albert Schweitzer Institute at Quinnipiac, where he has been a member of the faculty for twenty-five years.  He is happy that his role at the Schweitzer Institute gives him the opportunity to work towards building a Culture of Peace at Quinnipiac, by introducing an ethical framework into our consideration of peace, human rights, environmental stewardship and human health and development.

Panelists

Dr. Rahul Anand, an Associate Professor of Medical Sciences and Albert Schweitzer Faculty Fellow at Quinnipiac University. He is an Infectious Diseases physician and serves as the Director of Infectious Diseases at Community Health Services, Hartford. His teaching includes an award-winning curriculum on leadership for medical students based on an emotional intelligence framework.

Rick DelVecchio, currently serves as the director of career development for the College of Arts and Sciences at Quinnipiac. He has more than 16 years of experience in career development helping students to identify the intersection of their passions and the professional world.

Janet Ettele, an author, a musician, and a certified life coach. She uses the art of story to bridge 2500-year-old Buddhist teaching into our contemporary world and has published a series of contemporary fiction based on teachings by eight century Buddhist monk and scholar, Master Shantideva in his Guide to the Bodhisattva’s Way of Life (also known as The Six Perfections.) Janet graduated from Berklee College of Music in Boston where she majored in music composition; she has been teaching piano and music theory for over twenty-five years. As a Certified Life Coach, (New York University, SCPS) Janet offers mindfulness-based coaching to support clients as they navigate life’s transitions.

Amanda Klay, a third-year law student at Quinnipiac University School of Law (QUSL) and aspiring humanitarian immigration attorney. She has pre-law-school work experience in state government, academia, and community-based organizations. The common thread for Amanda is a passion for mentorship and dedication to expanding access and opportunity for all. She is honored to join the Compassion Conference community and is so excited to learn and share with panelists and attendees alike!  

Closing Music

Hymn to Avalokitesvara, Chinese Buddhist Chanting Group

Session Topic

The problems at the individual and societal level that result from social inequity, bias and inequality; enhancing inclusion and fairness to reduce marginalization and injustice. 

Panelists

Dr. Jennifer C. Dauphinais, an assistant teaching professor of education, and coordinator of the social-emotional learning (SEL) teacher development program in the School of Education. Jennifer's research engages discourse analysis with questions of curriculum and policy to trace the meaning-making of educational discourse communities and teacher-identities, and to investigate how competing discourses of schooling position youth across various goals and subjectivities.

Donald deGraffenried, LCSW is an Adjunct Professor with the QU School of Social Work.  He is a clinical social worker, with twenty-three years of experience using Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Therapy (EMDR) to help the victims of violence heal from post-traumatic stress.  He has a special interest in working with clients who have lost a family member to gun violence.

Mohammad Niamat Elahee Ph.D., a professor of International Business, has been teaching at Quinnipiac since 1999. He has also taught at universities in Bangladesh, Mexico, France, China, and Egypt, and recently was a US Fulbright Professor at Al Zaytoonah University of Jordan in Amman. His research interests include cross-cultural negotiation, foreign investment, consumer animosity and ethnocentrism, and globalization. Prior to joining academia, Dr. Elahee worked at Deloitte & Touche, the Canadian International Development Agency (Dhaka Office) and the World Bank Headquarters in Washington DC. Locally, he is involved with Columbus House, Peace Island Institute, and Hamden Rotary Club.

William Jellison, a social psychologist and teaches courses on the self-concept and social identities. His research explores contemporary forms of prejudice and the functions served by expressing and maintaining these attitudes. Furthermore, he explores factors that buffer the negative effects of sexual prejudice and contribute to positive identity development among LGBTQ individuals.

Grace Yukich, a Professor of Sociology at Quinnipiac University. She studies religion, immigration, race, politics, and culture, and she regularly teaches courses in these areas. She is the author of One Family Under God: Immigration Politics and Progressive Religion in America and co-editor of Religion Is Raced: Understanding American Religion.

Closing Music

Retire to concert at ASI

2:50 p.m. - Closing Salutation

3:15–4 p.m. - Music, followed by refreshments; Buckman Theater and Lobby

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