Nursing students take their skills abroad

A view of the Calvario Church, and volcanoes in the distance, from the center of Leon, Nicaragua.

A new perspective

Nursing students spent a week in Leon, Nicaragua, where they applied their skills in a global setting and explored a new culture.

D

uring spring break, 10 undergraduate nursing students traveled to Leon, Nicaragua, to apply their skills in a global setting and to learn about health care in another country.  While there, they worked with special needs children and older adults, and connected with local nursing students.

The nursing students made home visits to children with special health care needs who are currently being monitored by Quinnipiac physical therapy and occupational therapy students. The students performed assessments and educated the children and their families on specific aspects of each child's care.

The students held roundtable discussions with nursing students at the local public university, the National Autonomous University of Nicaragua. The nursing students also taught rural nursing assistants at a government-run program how to use simple alternative modalities in their practices. 

But, according to the nursing students, the highlight of the trip was a visit to La Casa Hogar Jacinta y Francicso, a home for the elderly in Leon. Students planned activities for the residents, including a hand massage station and a coloring book station, and organized a walk in a local park. The visit ended on an exciting note with some salsa dancing between students and residents.

While abroad, the nursing students lived with families in La Villa and spent time learning about the culture.

"This was my second trip to Nicaragua, and my first trip representing QU nursing,” said Annie Hall, the nursing delegation student leader. “I feel so incredibly lucky to have traveled to this beautiful country with nine other amazing nursing students. We were able to perform nursing assessments in medically fragile children's homes, brighten the day of the older adults in the Hogar residential home, and create strong connections with nursing students at the university in Leon and a rural nursing assistant school. It is my hope that we will continue to foster these relationships for years to come. I hope to be able to go back someday as an alumni nurse of Quinnipiac University."

“We were able to perform nursing assessments in medically fragile children's homes, brighten the day of the older adults in the Hogar residential home, and create strong connections with nursing students at the university in Leon and a rural nursing assistant school.”
Annie Hall, the nursing delegation student leader

Senior nursing students, from left, Jamie Baruffi and Brenna Sheehan, work with residents at a nursing home in NIcaragua.

Encouraging fun and healthy habits

Nursing students, from left, Jamie Baruffi and Brenna Sheehan, work with residents at a nursing home in Nicaragua.