Occupational, physical therapy students host Camp No Limits

Quinnipiac graduate occupational therapy student Adrianna Vicino races 7-year-old Rosie McRackan, of Raleigh, N.C., during Camp No Limits on July 7, at the Athletic and Recreation Center on our Mount Carmel Campus. This year, 45 occupational and physical therapy graduate students provided education, mentorship and support for children with limb loss and their families during the 3-day camp. This is the third year that the university has hosted the camp.

Impactful relationships

Quinnipiac graduate occupational therapy student Adrianna Vicino races 7-year-old Rosie McRackan, of Raleigh, N.C., during Camp No Limits on July 7, at the Athletic and Recreation Center on our Mount Carmel Campus. This year, 45 occupational and physical therapy graduate students provided education, mentorship and support for children with limb loss and their families during the 3-day camp. This is the third year that the university has hosted the camp.

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hirty-two children came to our Mount Carmel and York Hill campuses from across America to try new things, develop innovative skills and feel more independent.

The children, partnered with 45 graduate occupational and physical therapy students, participated in three days of purposefully designed events and activities at Camp No Limits. Camp No Limits provides education, mentorship opportunities and support for children limb loss

“Our students — who have been preparing for Camp No Limits all spring — walk away with the realization of how much they have to contribute and can work together on a PT/OT team to make a significant difference in children’s lives,” said Kim Hartmann, professor of occupational therapy and director of the Center for Interprofessional Healthcare. “They will work with children with various needs their entire career. To really see that these children have so much potential and want to play, be involved and learn is invaluable.”

Each of the children came to the camp earlier this month with at least one parent and, often, a sibling. This is the third year the university has hosted the camp, and we are proud to be the only university to host one of the 10 camps.

“They all feel educated and empowered to try new things,” Hartman said. “They do basketball, sled hockey and adaptive ice skating, field-day activities and adaptive arts and crafts.”

Newman's Own Foundation recently awarded The Center for Interprofessional Healthcare a $12,500 grant to provide scholarships and adaptive sports materials for Camp No Limits at the university. The grant will support families to attend the camp as well as adaptive arts, crafts and sports for the children with limb loss.