Interdisciplinary efforts help lead health care reform

Angela Mattie, professor of management and chair of health care management and organizational leadership in the School of Business at Quinnipiac University.

Leading the charge

Angela Mattie, professor of management and chair of health care management and organizational leadership in the School of Business, is a national voice in health care policy reform and patient safety.

T

hroughout her career, Professor Angela Mattie has been a major voice and leader in health care policy reform and patient safety. The former Robert Wood Johnson Fellow has worked hand-in-hand with key players in federal health policy on the U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, and continues to serve on numerous boards and committees statewide.

Mattie’s passion and brand of active leadership have carried over into her duties at Quinnipiac, where she is chair of health care management in the School of Business, professor of health sciences in School of Medicine and moderator for the campus chapter of ACHE (the American College of Healthcare Executives). She sees her job as more than educating students about health care paradigms and policies, or even helping them to find jobs.

“My primary goal is to get students involved,” she said. “What we want is to train the next generation of people right here to be fluent in patient safety tactics and technology.”

Professors Angela Mattie and Jennifer Herbst; Katherine Vaillancourt; Sara Dickson; and Emily Chumas; and Professor Anna-Leila Williams and Claire Barton smile in the Lynne L. Pantalena Law Library on our North Haven Campus. They are part of an interdisciplinary group investigating major issues facing the state.

A group effort

Professors Angela Mattie and Jennifer Herbst; Katherine Vaillancourt; Sara Dickson; and Emily Chumas; and Professor Anna-Leila Williams and Claire Barton smile in the Lynne L. Pantalena Law Library on our North Haven Campus. They are part of an interdisciplinary group investigating major issues facing the state.

Mattie’s students regularly tackle relevant and often polarizing issues. A group of her health care students recently investigated the legal, financial and public health implications of the funding cuts resulting from the Connecticut Hospitals Tax, a contentious bit of legislature meant to provide much needed income for Connecticut’s cities.

The group’s efforts have attracted attention in the health care community, and they have already submitted their findings to several conferences and peer reviewed journals. For Mattie, the project’s success supports a belief that she has held throughout her career.

School of Business School of Law

“I’ve always said that this interdisciplinary model is necessary for addressing the problems in our health care system,” she said. “Ideally, our efforts will serve as an example for others.”

Take the next step