Quinnipiac Poll: An election winner

Quinnipiac University Polling Institute.  Copyright Notice: Rich Gilligan @Hello Artists photographed in Spring 2016 for the new branding materials and new EDU website. Usage terms are: Marketing Collateral in perpetuity - e.g.-student guides, annual reports, flyers, brochures, public affairs, web/social media
- 3 years paid media.

T

he Quinnipiac Poll demonstrated once again why it’s the most accurate poll in the nation — correctly anticipating the margins of victories in the two gubernatorial elections this week.

Election memorabilia at the Quinnipiac Poll

Looking back

The Quinnipiac Poll began operations nearly 30 years ago — and has grown from a small poll that surveyed residents of Connecticut to the definitive national poll.

The day before Virginia’s gubernatorial election, the poll conducted a likely voter survey showing Democratic candidate Lt. Governor Ralph Northam leading Republican Ed Gillespie, 51-42, a margin of 9 percentage points. The following day, Northam defeated Gillespie 54-45, also a 9-point margin. While the other 11 polls conducted in Virginia by other organizations indicated that the race would be close — ranging anywhere from a tie to a 6-point difference, Quinnipiac’s was the only to show Northam winning comfortably.

Quinnipiac Poll

The Quinnipiac Poll also surveyed likely voters in New Jersey ahead of the state’s own gubernatorial election. The poll showed Democratic candidate Phil Murphy ahead of Republican candidate Lt. Governor Kim Guadagno in the race, 53-41, a margin of 12 percentage points. The final result was a Murphy victory by 12 points, 55-43. Polls by all other polling organizations in New Jersey indicated that Murphy would win by 14-16 percentage points.