"Stop Kiss" play raises awareness

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he Quinnipiac University theater program performed "Stop Kiss" in October, a moving love story that delves into the aftereffects of an instance of violence against the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

Written by Diana Son, the play revolves around two women, Callie and Sara, who fall in love unexpectedly. Their first kiss provokes a violent attack that transforms their lives in a way they could never anticipate.  

Senior Theo Pinnow, a crew member on the production said even though the play was written in the 1990s, the play felt current because the issues raised in the story still affect the LGBT community today.

“Having a play like this at Quinnipiac gives the university community an opportunity to better understand the harsh reality that some of its member's face in the larger community of Connecticut,” said Pinnow, a theater and English major, who designed the lighting for the production. He added that the importance of this production was amplified by the mass shooting at Pulse a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, where a gunman killed 49 people and wounded 53 others this summer. “This kind of violence still happens, and it needs to be talked about.” 

Nicolette Fino of Marlboro, New Jersey, played Callie and Jenna Gallagher of Newburyport, Massachusetts played the role of Sara; Liam Richards of Concord, New Hampshire, played George; Ryan Sheehan of Forestdale, Massachusetts, played Peter; Connor Whiteley of New Haven, Connecticut, played Detective Cole; Jamie Ackerman of Cherry Hill, New Jersey, played Mrs. Winsley; and Elizabeth Miller of Kalamazoo, Michigan, played the role of nurse.   

Drew Scott, an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Visual and Performing Arts at Quinnipiac, directed the play and Adam Rigg, an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Visual and Performing Arts, designed the set and costumes.

"Having a play like this at Quinnipiac gives the university community an opportunity to better understand the harsh reality that some of its member's face in the larger community of Connecticut.”
Theo Pinnow, senior theater and English major