Introduction

Faculty Biography

Brad Saxton headshot

Brad Saxton

Interim Dean
Professor of Law 

BA, The College of William and Mary; JD, University of Virginia

Areas of expertise


  • Torts
  • Employment Discrimination
  • Evidence
  • Legal Education

Biography

Biography


Brad Saxton is interim dean of the Quinnipiac University School of Law and professor of law; courses he has taught at the law school include torts, evidence, employment discrimination law and the Judicial Clerkship Seminar. Prior to joining Quinnipiac Law in 2002, Saxton was associate dean and professor of law at the University of Wyoming College of Law, where he taught torts, trial practice, legal writing and lawyering skills.

In 1985-1986, after graduating from the University of Virginia School of Law, Saxton clerked for The Honorable Louis F. Oberdorfer of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia. Before joining the faculty of the University of Wyoming College of Law in 1992, Saxton practiced law with Hogan & Hartson in Washington, D.C., where he specialized in employment law and litigation.

In 2013, Professor Saxton was honored by the Connecticut Bar Association with its Tapping Reeve Legal Educator Award; by the Connecticut Law Tribune with its Professor Quintin Johnstone Award for Service to the Legal Profession; and by the Pat Sappern Memorial Fund with its Pat Sappern Award.

Curriculum Vitae

Selected Publications

Selected Publications


Brad Saxton, Crossroads and Intersections: The Future of the Legal Profession, Legal Education and Access to Justice (In progress)

Brad Saxton, Symposium: Carmen Tortora Lecture Series: Honoring Professors Neal Feigenson and Linda Ross Meyer: Introduction, 30 QUINNIPIAC L. REV. 455 (2012)

Brad Saxton, Employment References in California After Randi W. v. Muroc Joint Unified School District: A Proposal for Legislation to Promote Responsible Employment Reference Practices, 18 BERKELEY J. EMP. & LAB. L. 240 (1997)

Brad Saxton, Flaws in the Laws Governing Employment References: Problems of "Over-Deterrence" and a Proposal for Reform, 13 YALE L. & POL'Y REV. 45 (1995)