Experts to discuss the legal issues facing low and moderate-income individuals

exterior photo of the School of Law Center framed by fall leaves

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wo law school professors will discuss their research on the legal issues facing low and moderate-income individuals when they present the talk, “Self-Help Reimagined: Connecticut Debt Collection Study,” from noon to 1:30 p.m. on Friday, February 28, on our North Haven campus in SLE-221.

James Greiner, professor of public law and faculty director of the Access to Justice Lab at Harvard Law School, and Dalié Jiménez, professor of law at the University of California Irvine School of Law, will talk about their newly developed framework for how courts, legal aid organizations, law school clinics and others might reconceptualize the design and delivery of civil legal materials for unrepresented individuals.

“Greiner and Jiménez think there are not enough lawyers to serve the civil legal needs of all low and moderate-income individuals,” said Charles Pillsbury, distinguished practitioner in residence and co-director of the Center on Dispute Resolution at Quinnipiac. “They will discuss how during their research with co-author Lois Lupica, they used Connecticut as their laboratory, and with input from Connecticut Legal Services, developed self-help materials for low and moderate-income individuals who cannot afford lawyers.”

The program, hosted by the Center on Dispute Resolution, is free and open to the public. To register, email sue.ney@quinnipiac.edu. For more information, contact Pillsbury at charles.pillsbury@quinnipiac.edu or 203-582-8145.