Nineteen students to stump for presidential candidates at New Hampshire Primary

A female student speaks on the phone while taking notes

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ineteen students from Quinnipiac will spend six days helping presidential candidates with their campaigns at the New Hampshire Primary.

The students are enrolled in, “Presidential Elections Campaigns: The New Hampshire Primary,” a public service learning course taught by Scott McLean, professor of political science at Quinnipiac. As part of the course, the students will visit New Hampshire to work for the candidates of their choice and prepare for the primary, February 7-12.

The students are: Sarah Annabi of Putnam Valley, New York (Joe Biden); Haktan Ceylan of Danbury, Connecticut (Pete Buttigieg); Nicholas Campanelli of Hope, Rhode Island (Andrew Yang); Tyler Delehoy of Canton, Connecticut (Bernie Sanders); Gabriel Farberov of Brooklyn, New York; (Donald Trump); Joshua Gorero of Durham, Connecticut (Yang); Zac Gormley of West Redding, Connecticut (Biden); John Hangen of Cheshire, Connecticut (Yang); Matthew Hawryluk of Monroe, Connecticut (Buttigieg); William Herring of Glastonbury, Connecticut (Biden); Stephan Kapustka of Glastonbury, Connecticut (Trump); Senaj Mersim of Oakville, Connecticut (Biden); Samantha Murdock of Windsor Locks, Connecticut (Biden); Ambar Pagan of Milford, Connecticut; (Elizabeth Warren); Myles Phillips-Wilcox of Fitchburg, Massachusetts (Warren); Jonathan Rosenblum of Middletown, Connecticut (Yang); Miriam Shawish of North Attleboro, Massachusetts (William Weld); George Tzimorangas of Sandwich, Massachusetts (Buttigieg) and Jensen Wilson of Milford, Connecticut (Buttigieg).

McLean said the course gives students a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to take part in a historic presidential primary. He has been bringing students to New Hampshire since the 2000 presidential election.

“Every hour of experience in New Hampshire and serving in a presidential campaign is a significant learning opportunity that can have enduring effects and impart real experiences of communication, leadership and civic engagement,” McLean said. “Those are transferrable skills that will endure throughout their lives.”