In our rapidly changing health care system, there is an urgent need for a new generation of physicians who value a patient-centered approach to primary care.

By the Numbers

100%


Satisfied

Percentage of first-year students who said in a recent survey that the faculty have created a respectful learning environment that fosters collaboration

100%


Matched

All of the students in the Class of 2017 matched with a residency program.

Program Overview

At the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine, we’ve established a vibrant teaching culture. Members of our faculty are experts in their respective specialties, but their primary focus is to teach. And we waste no time giving you hands-on experience. During your first semester, you’ll be paired with a local physician and spend one afternoon a week at his or her primary care practice interacting with patients and working with the staff. 

The medical school is located in Quinnipiac’s Center for Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, which enables collaboration and interprofessional team work with students pursuing degrees in other health care professions such as physical therapy and physician assistant. The center’s state-of-the-art facilities include an operating suite with two high-fidelity simulation rooms, a SimMan suite of lifelike mannequins that function as patient simulators, the latest imaging equipment and 16 standardized patient rooms where you’ll practice examining and diagnosing actors posing as patients. 

Throughout all four years, you will gain substantial clinical experience and work with faculty mentors. Our principal clinical partner is St. Vincent’s Medical Center in Bridgeport, Connecticut, with more than 150 physicians on our clinical faculty. And St. Vincent’s is also affiliated with Ascension Health, giving you access to a nationwide network of hospitals where you can complete electives, seek residency placements and explore employment opportunities. The Netter School has three Institutes for Excellence to support and encourage academic endeavors and research: primary care, rehabilitation medicine and global public health.

Sara Rahman (Class of 2018) and SP Paul Dufour

Room to practice

Sara Rahman, MD '18, practices her clinical skills in the Standardized Patient Assessment Center.

Quinnipiac first year medical student, Van Mai, works with Dr. Renika McLeod-Labissiere and her patients at Prospect Family Medicine on May 5, 2015. Image by Johnathon Henninger

Family-centered patient care

Van Mai, MD '18, works with Dr. Renika McLeod-Labissiere and her patients at Prospect Family Medicine.

Billy Zhang, a Quinnipiac Medical Student sees Dr. James O’Connor at his MeSH site, Pediatric Associates of Cheshire on May 6, 2015. Images by Johnathon Henninger

Capable hands

Billy Zhang, MD '18, examines a patient at Pediatric Associates of Cheshire, a MeSH site.

Video Spotlight: Srijan Adhikari

Helping others a world away

Srijan Adhikari used the lessons he learned at the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine to improve the conditions of his native Nepal following a devastating earthquake.

Curriculum

Year One


The first year consists of the following courses, split up into different blocks each semester:

  • Foundations of Medicine Course (18 hours/week)
  • Clinical Arts & Sciences (6 hours/week)
  • Scholarly Reflection and Concentration/Capstone Course (4 hours/week)

Recurring and integrated themes throughout year one include: nutrition, behavioral and social science, pharmacology and ethics.

Semester One


  • Block 1 – Foundations of Science I
  • Block 2 – Foundations of Science II
  • Block 3 – Musculoskeletal and Integument Year 1

Semester Two


  • Block 4  Neuroscience – Head and Neck
  • Block 5 Cardiovascular, Renal and Pulmonary
  • Block 6 Gastrointestinal, Genitourinary and Reproductive

Year Two


The second year consists of the following courses, split up into different blocks each semester:

  • Foundations of Medicine Course (18 hours/week)
  • Clinical Arts & Sciences Course (6 hours/week)
  • Scholarly Reflection & Concentration Capstone Course (4 hours/week)

Recurring and integrated themes throughout year two include: nutrition, behavioral and social science, pharmacology, endocrinology and ethics.

Semester One


  • Block 1  Fundamentals of Pathology and Microbiology
  • Block 2 Neurology and Psychiatry
  • Block 3 Heart, Lung, and Kidney

Semester Two


  • Block 4  Neuroscience – Head and Neck
  • Block 5 Cardiovascular, Renal and Pulmonary
  • Block 6 Gastrointestinal, Genitourinary and Reproductive

Year Three


In-depth clinical education experiences through required clerkships in family medicine, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry and surgery. Students receive training in both ambulatory and inpatient settings.

Year Four


Required clinical experiences consist of an intensive care clerkship, an emergency medicine clerkship and an inpatient sub-internship. During this year, students also choose clinical electives, complete the capstone project and participate in interviews for residency programs.

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