Site Alert Title

Alert Icon

poster image

School of Engineering

Carret icon

By the Numbers

98%


Success Rate

Percentage of School of Engineering Class of 2018 graduates who are working or enrolled in graduate education programs

53.9%


Future Hires

Percentage of businesses that plan to hire computer science degree holders in 2016 (National Association of Colleges and Employers)

$64,891


Average Salary

Average salary for graduates with engineering degrees in 2016 (National Association of Colleges and Employers)

Faculty

Field innovators and classroom mentors

Our faculty members have earned advanced degrees from many of the nation’s top engineering graduate programs. They bring decades of combined industry experience plus a collective passion for education to the classroom. Acting as academic advisers, coaches and mentors, they oversee their students’ transformation into extraordinarily well-prepared professionals, leaders and lifelong learners.

Our faculty do more than teach you modern engineering theories, practices and technology. They inspire you to see beyond field conventions and think of innovative ways to make their communities safer, stronger and more sustainable.

Meet our faculty
John Reap, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, works on a machine prototype that will assist workers in Guatemala.

Global impact

John Reap, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, works on a machine prototype that will assist workers in Guatemala who make eco bricks from bottles filled with shredded trash. The bricks are then used to build schools and houses.

Faculty Spotlight

Professor Priscilla Fonseca works with civil engineering students to evaluate many different types of building materials.

Strong connections

Professor Priscilla Fonseca works with civil engineering students to evaluate many different types of building materials.

Strength under pressure

Professor Priscilla Fonseca, whose specialty is structural analysis and design, quite literally “breaks” conventions. In her civil engineering material course, she shows her students how alternative, sustainable construction materials can build better, stronger infrastructure, tools and consumer products.

As a collaborative project, she and her students constructed fiber-reinforced concrete bowling balls. Steel, glass and nylon fibers proved to be more economical, labor saving and easier to transport than traditional steel rebar — and just as reliable. The project was a success, and just one example of how our students get to examine and conquer the same challenges faced by licensed engineers.

Meet our faculty

Photo Gallery

Accreditation

Recognized among the best

Our mechanical, civil, industrial and software engineering programs are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, which signifies that they meet the highest standards of engineering education in the country. Through exposure to existing and emerging technologies, interdisciplinary projects and innovative practices, we prepare our graduates to lead the way in the most critical engineering fields. They also learn to anticipate the many needs of a growing society, and how to fulfill them with the highest standards of quality, safety and precision.

Programs at a Glance

World-class programs for a growing engineering landscape

Transportation, software development, renewable energies and optimization — the world of engineering is multifaceted, offering many specialties and career paths. Which path speaks to your talents and professional goals? Quinnipiac offers bachelor’s degree programs in four of the fastest growing engineering fields — mechanical, civil, industrial and software — as well as in computer science. 

Each program grounds you first in theory, then builds technical proficiency through both independent and interdisciplinary projects. Classrooms are small, student-centered and emphasize interactive learning with the same powerful software, machinery and materials used by professional engineers and computer scientists. We also place great emphasis on preparing you for the FE (Fundamentals of Engineering) certificate, which you'll earn during your senior year. The first of the NCEES exams, the FE certificate represents the first major step toward becoming a licensed engineer.

Dual-degree program

The School of Engineering also offers an online MS in Cybersecurity program that equips students with the most advanced prevention, detection and recovery methods necessary to defend against cyber attaches, making graduates indispensable in virtually every industry. Students have the option to take it as a dual-degree (4+1) program.

Grand Challenges

Improving sustainability, health, security and joy of living

The School of Engineering curricula is officially recognized by the National Academy of Engineering’s “14 Grand Challenges for Engineering” facing global society in the 21st century. Behind everything we do is an emphasis on improving sustainability, health, security and joy of living for people all over the world. Students also have the opportunity to participate in the Grand Challenges Scholars program through competing the five competency areas. Students that participate in this program receive an additional certification recognized by the National Academy of Engineers.

poster image

Photograph

Rachel Davis '17 modifies the electric toy car of Nolan Green, 3, a child born with cerebral palsy.

Finding inspiration

Rachel Davis '17 modifies the electric toy car of Nolan Green, 3, a child born with cerebral palsy. In a partnership with The GoBabyGo! Initiative, Davis and professors Jose Riofrio, Rose Flammang and Michelle Broggi, spent countless hours outfitting the car to meet Nolan's mobility needs.

School and Campus Life

Collaborate, explore and make a difference

Regardless of the discipline, the School of Engineering is an inclusive community of equally driven and curious professionals who share the same passion for hands-on learning.

The Quinnipiac University Student Engineering Organization (QUESO) raises engineering awareness through various yearly events and community engagement projects. QUESO additionally holds networking events that bring together alumni, students, faculty and employers. 

Engineering students participate in other events that are at once creative, competitive and collaborative. The computer science program’s High School Programming Competition bring teams of students together to excite future programmers, while the annual Hackathon focuses on a variety of topics, including the development of Android apps. The program is aimed at helping the kids improve their math skills, tell time and build stronger vocabularies. Off campus, students from all of our degree areas have exceled at competitions such as the Connecticut Technology Council's CT Skills Challenge, and successfully represented Quinnipiac at the ASEE Northeast Conference.

An engineering student receives his hard hat during the annual hard hat ceremony that welcomes new students.

Joining a legacy

Engineering student Dan Dresselhouse ’20 receives his hard hat during the annual ceremony. The ceremony is a beloved tradition where upper class students welcome newer students to the fold.

Ten engineering students pose with a Quinnipiac flag at Winnisquam Lake in central New Hampshire over the summer.

Lifelong connections

Small classes and collaborative learning will allow you to build robust relationships with your peers that will last long after completing your degree. These 10 engineering students celebrated their friendships and accomplishments at Winnisquam Lake in central New Hampshire over the summer shortly after graduation.

Engineering faculty take on students in the third annual soccer game in April 2017 on the York Hill Campus.

A tradition of friendly competition

Engineering faculty take on students in the third annual soccer game in April 2017 on the York Hill Campus.

Career Development

Preparing you to excel

Job growth continues to increase in nearly every engineering-related field, from health care informatics and cyber security to national infrastructure and robotics. The experience and expertise you gain here positions you at the forefront of that growth.

Challenging yourself in the field is a vital part of your academic and career development. Internships with Connecticut and New York-based engineering firms, manufacturing companies and app developers aren’t simply offered — they are required of all engineering students.

We believe in building professional competence in the classroom, while offering resources for networking outside of it. You’ll have the opportunity to join student chapters of major professional engineering societies, such as the ASCE and IISE. These, as well as other unique partnerships and resources, connect you with experienced alumni and potential future employers.

Opportunities for students


  • Independent research opportunities
  • Fully equipped and modern facilities
  • Numerous internship locations
  • Professional engineering societies
  • Service learning opportunities

Photograph

Ashlen Blake ’20 and Nsonsa Kisala ’20, mechanical engineering majors, collaborate outside of an engineering lab.

Common ground

Ashlen Blake ’20 and Nsonsa Kisala ’20, mechanical engineering majors, collaborate outside of an engineering lab.

Admissions and Financial Aid

Let’s get to work

You’re committed to making the world a stronger, safer and more sustainable place. We’re committed to getting you started as soon as possible. Admissions counselors will guide you through the applications process, answer any questions you have about requirements and help get you enrolled in the program that speaks to your strengths and goals.

Our Work

Engineering know-how meets world impact

The School of Engineering is built upon an academic culture of doing, and students here love what they do. In addition to preparing themselves for rewarding careers, they have the opportunity to use their knowledge and hands-on expertise to improve communities and educate younger generations both at home, and around the world.

Partnerships with nonprofit organizations, such as Habitat for Humanity, offer engineering students a way to use their skills to aid displaced families. They also have an opportunity to participate in STEM-related education projects with local schools, in conjunction with the Bristol-Myers Squibb Center for Science Teaching and Learning.